Elderly Cats and Diet

Bubba is 21 years old and going strong.

Bubba is 21 years old and going strong.

Let’s begin by stating the obvious: senior cats are generally less active, which means their nutrional needs will change. The focus needs to be on the quality of food — not quantity — otherwise your cat could become obese and prone to several major health problems. Diabetes, digestive and urinary problems are three big concerns for senior cats.

There is no standard rule for a good diet. It is important to know your cat and observe any changes in its behavior and eating.

Your cat might need a little less protein but it is still essential. Too much protein can strain aging kidneys; too little and their immune system could become compromised. Look for a product with protein from meat — not meat byproducts — as one of the top ingredients. Meat byproducts are OK but not an ideal choice.

Inexpensive cat food tend to contain fatty fillers that are less nourishing and tougher for senior cats to digest. Your cat needs food that is easy to chew and digest. If constipation is an issue, look for a product with added fiber.

When you read the labels, look for ash content levels. Less ash equals better food.

Read more about dietary guidelines at TLC.com

Below are a few popular senior pet food products. This list does not imply an endorsement for any product or service. More choices are available at Petco.com and Amazon.com. Always consult your veterinarian before implementing any dietary changes.

Felidae Platinum Diet Formula

Nutro Natural Choice Complete Care Senior Dry Cat Food

Friskies

Castor & Pollux (organic)

Wellness (organic)
Hill’s Science Diet

Editor’s Note: We welcome your products reviews and suggestions along with tips for feeding your elderly cat on a budget.

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3 Comments

Filed under cat health, cat lovers, cats, senior pets

3 responses to “Elderly Cats and Diet

  1. I would not recommend Nutro. The company has way too many recall issues, one being as recently as a couple months ago.

    Friskies and Hill’s are pretty bad, too. I think senior pets need extra precautionary help, and those brands won’t offer it.

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